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Tibetan history begins with the incursions of Tibetan K'iang in Central China when Buddha was living in India, Confucius and Lao-tseu in China (5th century B.C.). The History of Tibet can be divided in two parts = the first one with the establishment and the end of the Tibetan Kingdoms, the second with the establishment and the end of the Dalai-Lama Theocracy. During both periods civil and religious problems are mixed and cannot be made distinct. In the seventh century, the Tibetan King Sron-tsan-gampo was very powerful and a menace to the Chinese Empire. During this period, many famous buildings and holy places were built.At the same time, the Indian and Nepalese cultures of South Asia, the Persian and Arabic cultures of West Asia and especially the Han Chinese culture of the Central Plain had considerable influence on the development of Tibetan culture. ...

Lhasa is the Capital City of Tibet. Anyone visiting Lhasa will enjoy spectacular examples of sculpture, paintings and textiles, some woven with gold and pearls that were the focus of the Dalai Lamas' religious meditation.

Tibetan Buddhism constitutes one of the three branches of Buddhism and has been disseminated to a vast area including Tibet,Sichuan,Qinghai Gansu,Yuannan,Inner Mongolia and Xingjiang.Owing to historical reasons,almost all the Tibetan and Mongo lian people are its followers and a lot of other minority ethnic grops like the Yugu,Menba,Tu and Qing peple also believe in Tibetan Buddhism.This chapter focuses on the evolvement,features and major religious rituals of this branch of Buddhism.

buddha eye, wisdom eyes

Every stupa (Buddhist shrine) in Nepal, there are pairs of eyes staring out from the four sides of the main tower.The mysterious eyes, painted on all four sides of the stupa's spire, represent the eyes of the Buddha and face the four cardinal directions--east, west, north, and south.

These are Called Buddha Eyes (also known as Wisdom Eyes), and they look out in the four directions to symbolize the omniscience (all-seeing) of a Buddha.
The Buddha eyes are so prevalent throughout the country that they have become a symbol of Nepal itself.we can Find Many Handicraft symbolizing Buddha Eyes.ie:Pendents, Thanka paintings Rings etc. 

A Tibetan Malas, namely the buddhism beads is a string of prayer beads, comparable to a rosary, used when reciting mantras or counting prayer. Tibetan Malas are usually made with 108, 27, 21 or 19 beads. They are used to count prayers or mantras. Buddhists use counters to keep track of how many times around a mala they have counted. Malas made of wood are the most common, but some of our most popular are made of turquoise, copper, lotus seed and yakbone bone. Check out our handmade turquoise malas, handmade copper malas, handmade lotus seed malas and handmade yakbone malas as bellow.

babao tibetan bracelet

The eight auspicious symbols of Tibetan Buddhism consist of: a parasol, a pair of fishes, a treasure vase, a lotus, a white-spiraling conch shell, an endless knot, a victory banner, and a golden wheel.

Groupings of eight auspicious symbols were originally used in India at ceremonies such as an investiture or coronation of a king. An early grouping of symbols included: a throne, a swastika, a handprint, a hooked knot, a vase of jewels, a water libation flask, a pair of fishes, and a lidded bowl. In Buddhism, these eight symbols of good fortune represent the offerings made by the gods to Shakyamuni Buddha immediately after he gained enlightenment. The following expounds upon these symbols.

tibetan prayer box

One of the most stunning pieces of Tibetan jewelry is the famed Gau pendant. Also called a prayer box pendant, this jewellery piece often features rare and unusual gemstones and incredible carved silverworks.

In Buddhism, the Gau is actually a portable shrine that holds an image wrapped in silk that represents the owner's personal deity. Some Ghaus have a small opening allow you to see the personality deity.

People of other faiths use the Gau as a prayer box. Wearers write their prayer concerns on a slip of paper and place it in the box.

The dorje is the symbol of enlightenment. The shape of the dorje symbolizes the two forms of truth, relative and absolute. The connection of the two truths in the middle is known as the sphere of actual reality. On the outer parts of the dorje there are two discs that represent the five Buddha families, the five elements, and the five skandhas. In Tibetan the word dorje means, “the indestructible stone.?The dorje is a spiritual weapon used to banish non-truths and bring in the truth. The dorje is often used in a Tibetan Buddhist ritual, where it is twirled in order to bring in truth.

In Buddhist practice, singing bowls are used as a support for meditation, trance induction and prayer. For example, Chinese Buddhists use the singing bowl to accompany the wooden fish during chanting, striking it when a particular phrase in a sutra, mantra or hymn is sung. In Japan and Vietnam, singing bowls are similarly used during chanting and may also mark the passage of time or signal a change in activity.

The use of singing bowls in Tibet is the subject of much debate and many stories. Some people say they were used for meditation while others say they were magical tools for transformation of self and of matter.

Singing bowls are played by the friction of rubbing a wooden, plastic, or leather wrapped mallet around the rim of the bowl to produce overtones and a continuous 'singing' sound. Audio Sample (help·info) Genuine antique singing bowls produce a complex chord of harmonic overtones. Singing bowls may also be played by striking with a soft mallet to produce a warm bell tone. Audio Sample (help·info)

Antique singing bowls are unique because they are multiphonic instruments, producing multiple harmonic overtones at the same time. Antique singing bowls are the fruit of sophisticated metallurgy, techniques currently deemed lost and provide a unique study in the Timeline of materials technology as do high quality bells and other instruments. The overtones are a result of their metalworking and fabrication which consists of multiple metals and were produced by a sophisticated hammered or beaten technique with . The majority of new bowls are cast metal and not hammered and beaten with Metalworking hand tools, and produce only one tone.

Both Antique and New Bowls are widely used as an aid to meditation (see the "Meditation and the brain" section in Meditation) and as a tool for trance induction. They are also used in yoga, music therapy, sound healing, religious services, performance and for personal enjoyment.

Klachakra Pendant

The Klachakra symbol means 'The one with ten powers'. It is very protective and dispels negativity. It consists of seven individual syllables combined together with three other components to make a total of ten very powerful elements within the image. - The Ten Powers are described as ten existences - body, awareness, space, wind, fire, water, earth, stable, moving, and the gods unseen and uncreated. Each part of the Kalachakra symbol has deep specific meaning, and is a great study unto itself.

The use of Tibetan masks extends throughout the Himalayan region, from locations as diverse as the tropical lowlands of Nepal --- the Terai --- to the high mountain villages of the Sherpas to the monasteries of Tibet and Bhutan. Most Himalayan masks are created locally of indigenous materials for particular ceremonies and are put away for the remainder of the year. We handpicked all our Tibetan Buddhist Masks in Nepal & Tibet which promises you 100% good quality and your online shopping satisfaction!

A "Thangka," also known as "Tangka", "Thanka" or "Tanka" (Pronunciation: [toːnkoː], the 'th' as an aspirated 't' and the 'a' as in the word water) (Tibetan: Nepal Bhasa:पौभा) is a painted or embroidered Buddhist banner which was hung in a monastery or a family altar and occasionally carried by monks in ceremonial processions. In Tibetan the word thang means flat, and thus the Thangka is a kind of painting done on flat surface but which can be rolled up when not required for display, sometimes called a scroll-painting. The most common shape of a Thangka is the upright rectangular form.

Originally, thangka painting became popular among traveling monks because the scroll paintings were easily rolled and transported from monastery to monastery. These thangka served as important teaching tools depicting the life of the Buddha, various influential lamas and other deities and Bodhisattva. One popular subject is The Wheel of Life, which is a visual representation of the Abhidharma teachings (Art of Enlightenment).

While regarded by some as colorful wall hangings, to Buddhists, these Tibetan religious paintings offer a beauty, believed to be a manifestation of the divine, and are thus visually stimulating.

 
 
 
 
shimbuddhist mala
shim
 
     
 
 

Welcome to www.buddhistprayerbeads.net. Tibetan Buddhist Prayer beads ( 108 beads and malas beads bracelet) date back to sometime around 500BC and according to most historians the point of origin was somewhere in India. Tibetan Buddhist Prayer beads spread out from there to the Middle East, China and Japan. Tibetan Buddhist Prayer beads have various names, originally known in India as Mala, (Sanskrit, meaning garland), Misbah by the Muslims and Sufi’s, and Worry beads in Greece. In the Catholic tradition, the beads were carved into roses, from which the word rosary evolved. Prayer beads in India came from the ancient Hindu Vedic tradition which had great reverence for sound. The Sanskrit language and its alphabet were both considered to have divine origin, and are therefore considered sacred. It is said that all creation manifested from these cosmic vibrations, which are represented by the 50 letters of the Sanskrit alphabet and their corresponding sounds.

wooden mala

OM is the universal sound and the origin of all other sound vibration and therefore the manifest universe. Chanting the sounds of the Sanskrit letters and various words used as sacred mantras (sounds that take one beyond the mind) are used to realize yoga (union) with God, Absolute Being. Malas appeared in the Buddhist tradition in Asia some time after the development of the Mahayana (The Great Vehicle Path). There is a sutra (thread of knowledge) in which a King prays to the Buddha for a simple practice to help ease his suffering from various difficulties and the Buddha responded by telling him to string 108 seeds and recite the three part refuge prayer upon them. Hindus who converted to the Buddhist faith brought their malas with them from India to China, Japan , and eventually Tibet. The mala was one of the main tools used to focus ones mind and devotional aspirations. These "garlands" of sacred sound vibration were recited over and over. The mala itself becomes empowered with spiritual energy as a result of these mantric recitations and further aids ones practice. This devotional practice became part of Buddhism.

om mala, om mantra mala, pearl mala

Buddhist mala beads are commonly made from seeds of the Bodhi tree. In Tibet, malas often include semi-precious stones. Turquoise, amethyst, lapis lazuli, and coral are often used with copper, nickel, silver and brass together with yak bone for their healing properties. In general the purpose of all mala beads is to help create peace and harmony for the individual, the community and the environment, all of which are manifestations of Absolute Being through the original OM vibration. The semi-precious gemstones often used in malas and jewelry have significance for many people worldwide. It is believed that turquoise brings prosperity, good fortune, strength and helps overcome illness. Native Americans have praised the qualities of turquoise since the time of the Aztecs.

amber mala, amber prayer beads

The Navajos believed it could help appease the “Wind Spirits” and the Tibetans use turquoise in their ritual religious objects as well as jewelry, also to temper the “Winds”. Turquoise was esteemed by Tibetan Shamans for both its spiritual and physical healing and protective qualities. Ancient manuscripts from India, Afghanistan and the Middle East also refer to the healing effects of wearing turquoise. Due to the degradation of our planet, and the many stress related illness’s of our modern times, the earthly elements and healing properties of turquoise make it increasingly more important and popular for people all over the world today.

 
bodhi mala, bodhi prayer beads
  Labels: Buddhist prayer beads, malas, tibetan malas, buddhist malas, turquoise malas, handmade turquoise malas, buddhist mala, tibetan mala, tibetan mala beads, tibetan buddhist mala, tibetan prayer beads, malas prayer beads, rudraksha malas, wrist malas, buddhist prayer beads bracelet, bodhi seed malas, fine wood malas  
 
 
 

 

 
     
 

coral mala, sandalwood mala

Turquoise, Coral, Mila amber, and yakbone beads are the most used materials for the tibetan & Nepal craftsmen to created tibetan malas and buddhist prayer beads. Also sandal wood, bohdi seed are commonly used.

buddhist mala, buddhist prayer beads

How to use your Tibetan Buddhist Mala

Recite one mantra; move your thumb and forefinger along the next bead of the strand; then repeat.

The Tibetan Buddhist mala, or beaded rosary, aids the practitioner in counting mantra recitations while also helping one to focus concentration and awareness. As one works the mala's beads with one's fingers, recites the mantra and visualizes the deity, one is at once involving the body, speech and mind.

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seed malas, yakbone malas, fine wood malas

Some Mala Basics

The mala is held with gentleness and respect, generally in the left hand. One bead is counted for each recitation of the mantra, beginning with the first bead after the "guru" bead- the larger, more decorative bead at the mala's end. The first bead is held between the index finger and thumb, and with each count the thumb pulls another bead in place over the index finger.

After completing a full circuit of the mala, the practitioner flips the mala around 180 degrees (this takes practice to accomplish) and continues as before, in reverse order. One aims to avoid passing over the "guru" bead, as doing so is symbolically like stepping over one's teacher.

fine wood malas, seed malas

Choosing a Mala

Discover the benefits & healing properties of our Tibetan Buddhist malas.

A mala of 108 beads is used for general purposes by most practicing Tibetan Buddhists. Beads of bodhi seed generally are considered auspicious for any practice or mantra, and red sandalwood or lotus seeds also are widely recommended for universal use.

A variation of the standard 108-bead mala is the wrist mala of 27 beads - four circuits total 108 mantra repetitions.

Besides the multi-purpose malas described above, there are other types of malas that are deemed auspicious for various purposes.

Mantras can be recited for four different purposes: to appease, to increase, to overcome, or to tame by forceful means.

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bohdi seed malas, bodhi seed prayer beads

The beads used to count mantras intended to appease should be of crystal, pearl or mother of pearl, and should at least be clear or white in color. A rosary for this purpose should have 100 such beads. Mantras counted on these beads serve to clear away obstacles, such as illness and other calamities, and purify one of unwholesomeness.

The beads used with mantras intended to increase should be of gold, silver, copper or lotus seeds, and a rosary is made of 108 of them. The mantras counted on these serve to increase life span, knowledge and merit.

The beads used with mantras which are intended to overcome are made from a compound of ground sandal wood, saffron and other fragrant substances. There are 25 beads on this rosary. The mantras counted on them are meant to tame others, but the motivation for doing so should be a pure wish to help other sentient beings and not to benefit oneself.

The beads used to recite mantras aiming at subduing beings through forceful means should be made from raksha seeds or human bones in a string of 60. Again, as the purpose should be absolutely altruistic, the only person capable of performing such a feat is a Bodhisattva motivated by great compassion for a being who can be tamed through no other means, for example extremely malicious spirits, or general afflictions, visualized as a dense black ball.

fine wood malas, agarwood malas, tibetan malas

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Amethyst Mala
Amethyst is a powerful aid to creative thinking, spiritual awareness and healing. It is believed to ease headaches, relieve pain and help combat insomnia.

Bodhi Seed Mala
It was under a Bodhi tree, at Bodhgaya in India, that the Buddha attained enlightenment. For this reason the Bodhi Seed is highly valued and is said to enrich the mind.

Carnelian Mala
Carnelian is a stone of life force and energy. It is said to increase ambition, drive and confidence and to protect against negative emotions and illness. It is also reputed to bring about warmth, sociability, creativity and happiness and to restore self-esteem.

wrist malas

Crystal Mala
Crystal amplifies prayers, healing, thoughts, wishes and positive visualisations. It works on every level to bring the body into balance and boosts the immune system. It is believed to supply positive energy and help dispel negative energy.

Dzi Bead Mala
Dzi beads can help to protect from the negative elements and energies thereby promoting physical and spiritual harmony. They are believed to balance the body hence improving the body’s immune system, promoting overall health and a feeling of calm within oneself.

Honeystone Mala
Honeystone gently amplifies energy and assists in the challenges associated with change. It is said to enhance higher consciousness, intellect and memory. Physically, honeystone is beneficial for kidneys, bladder, female organs and menopause.

dzi bracelet, dzi malas

Jade Mala
Jade promotes love, courage, justice and wisdom. It is also believed to calm the mind by helping to release negative thoughts. It is thought to calm the nervous system, cleanse the blood, and to remove toxins. It is said to be an excellent stone for the kidneys.

Lotus Seed Mala
The lotus seed symbolises spiritual knowledge and power. The seed has calming properties that alleviate restlessness, palpitations and insomnia. It is said the lotus seed improves concentration and benefits the spleen, kidney and heart.

Onyx Mala
Black Onyx is a soothing and comforting stone, useful in times of grief or excessive mental or physical stress. It is said to help alleviate fears and worries and to help you feel comfortable within your self and in your surroundings. It is also believed to promote stamina and vigour and to encourage the making of wise decisions.

wrist malas, buddhist pryaer beads bracelet

Rose Quartz Mala
Rose Quartz is known as 'The Stone of Unconditional Love'. It is said to open the Heart Chakra and to encourage forgiveness helping us to let go of anger, resentment and jealousy. Placing Rose Quartz by your bed or under you pillow can aid sleep.
Rose Quartz is said to smooth the complexion, sooth burns and blistering, strengthen the physical heart, alleviate vertigo and heal chest, lung, kidney and adrenal problems.

Rosewood Mala
Rosewood has compassionate and loving heart qualities. The energy of rosewood is primarily feminine, and focused on spiritual, intuitive health and beauty. Rosewood is especially effective in spiritual healing and nourishing.

Sandalwood Mala
Sandalwood is one of the traditional materials used for malas. A soothing, peaceful and fragrant wood it is said to attract positive subtle vibrations, bring clear perception, promote tranquility and a positive frame of mind.
Sandalwood is an antidepressant, antiseptic, insecticidal, and sedative wood. It can assist in the healing of cells and is used to assist the immune system in any healing process or to prevent illness.

prayer beads malas, tibetan wrist malas

Tiger's Eye Mala
Tiger's Eye is both grounding and uplifting. It promotes a positive attitude, laughter and humour, and it is said to attract prosperity, wealth and success.

Turquoise Mala
Turquoise is a protective crystal. It can help calm the nerves when speaking in public, stabilise mood swings, bring inner calm, dissolve self-sabotage and allow self-expression. It is said to help you find your true path in life.

Yak Bone Mala
Using a bone mala is a reminder of impermanence - the more we contemplate impermanence and death the more fruitful our life becomes. Yak bone is also said to maintain good blood circulation.

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Buddhist prayer beads are traditional devotional tools of prayer used in various forms of Buddhism. They are similar to other forms of prayer beads and the Rosary used in various world religions; thus this tool has also been known as the Buddhist rosary.

 

Buddhist Prayer Beads in Different Cultures

Prayer beads or japa malas are used in many forms of Mahayana Buddhism, often with a lesser number of beads than the Hindu japa malas 108 (number)--usually a divisor of 108. In Pure Land Buddhism, for instance, 27-bead rosaries are common.

Mahayana Buddhism

In Chinese culture such rosaries are named shu zhu 数珠("counting beads"), Fo zhu 佛珠 ("Buddha beads"), or nian zhu 念珠 ("prayer beads"). Chinese court beads (Chinese: 朝珠; pinyin: cháozhū) also derive from Buddhist prayer beads.

In Japanese Buddhism, they are known as "juzu" (数珠 counting beads) or "nenju" (念珠 thought beads), and both words are usually preceded by the honorific 'o-' (as in "o-juzu" (御数珠)). Female speakers make use of the honorific o- more often than male speakers.

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Japanese Buddhism

Jodo Shu
In the Japanese Jodo Shu sect of Buddhism, double-ringed rosaries are used to aid in the counting of recitations of the nembutsu, or Amida Buddha's name. The outer ring counts the individual recitations, while each bead in the inner ring counts one full revolution. In addition, many such rosaries contain two pairs of tassels containing additional beads to count full revolutions of the second ring, or even revolutions of the first tassel of beads. A full count, including all the beads on the rosary, can equal up to 60,000 recitations, though many practitioners chose smaller goals to suit their ability.

Jodo Shinshu
In the Japanese Jodo Shinshu sect of Buddhism, there is no emphasize on counting recitations of the nembutsu, so rosaries are used more for ornamentation and ritual, than for counting. Typically the rosary will be draped over both hands, while in gassho, to symbolize the one-ness of the individual with Amida Buddha.

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Shingon Buddhism

In the Japanese Shingon sect, another branch of Vajrayana Buddhism, the traditional 108-bead rosary is used for the counting of mantra recitations. Often during rituals, followers will vigorously rub the rosary between their hands as a symbolic gesture of purification.

Theravada Buddhism

Theravada Buddhists in Myanmar also use prayer beads, called ba-di [bədí]. Such beads are typically made of fragrant wood, with a series of brightly-coloured strings at the end of the beads.

Tibetan Buddhism

In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doing prostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations.

Number Of Beads And Significance

In traditional Buddhist thought, people are said to have 108 afflictions or klesas. There are 6 senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, touch, and consciousness) multiplied by 3 reactions (positive, negative, or indifference) makes 18 "feelings." Each of these feelings can be either "attached to pleasure or detached from pleasure" making 36 "passions"-- each of which may be manifested in the past, present, or future. All the combinations of all these things makes a total of 108, which are represented by the beads in the ojuzu. This same number is also used in Japanese New Year services where a bell is run 108 times.

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In addition, practitioners of Vajrayana Buddhism, use the number 108 for a different purpose. After reciting 100 mantras, 8 extra mantras are done to compensate for any errors.

Tibetan prayer wheels (called Mani wheels by the Tibetans) are devices for spreading spiritual blessings and well being. Rolls of thin paper, imprinted with many, many copies of the mantra (prayer) Om Mani Padme Hum, printed in an ancient Indian script or in Tibetan script, are wound around an axle in a protective container, and spun around and around. Typically, larger decorative versions of the syllables of the mantra are also carved on the outside cover of the wheel.

Tibetan Buddhists believe that saying this mantra, out loud or silently to oneself, invokes the powerful benevolent attention and blessings of Chenrezig, the embodiment of compassion. Viewing a written copy of the mantra is said to have the same effect -- and the mantra is carved into stones left in piles near paths where travelers will see them. Spinning the written form of the mantra around in a Mani wheel is also supposed to have the same effect; the more copies of the mantra, the more the benefit.

Tibetan Buddhists believe that saying the mantra (prayer), Om Mani Padme Hum, out loud or silently to oneself, invokes the powerful benevolent attention and blessings of Chenrezig, the embodiment of compassion. Viewing the written form of the mantra is said to have the same effect -- it is often carved into stones, like the one pictured above, and placed where people can see them. Spinning the written form of the mantra around in a Mani wheel (or prayer wheel) is also believed to give the same benefit as saying the mantra, and Mani wheels, small hand wheels and large wheels with millions of copies of the mantra inside, are found everywhere in the lands influenced by Tibetan Buddhism.

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People who learn about the mantra naturally want to know what it means, and often ask for a translation into English or some other Western language. However, Om Mani Padme Hum can not really be translated into a simple phrase or even a few sentences.
All of the Dharma is based on Buddha's discovery that suffering is unnecessary: Like a disease, once we really face the fact that suffering exists, we can look more deeply and discover it's cause; and when we discover that the cause is dependent on certain conditions, we can explore the possibility of removing those conditions.

Buddha taught many very different methods for removing the cause of suffering, methods appropriate for the very different types and conditions and aptitudes of suffering beings. For those who had the capacity to understand it, he taught the most powerful method of all, a method based on the practice of compassion. It is known as the Mahayana, or Great Vehicle, because practicing it benefits all beings, without partiality. It is likened to a vast boat that carries all the beings in the universe across the sea of suffering.

Within the Mahayana the Buddha revealed the possibility of very quickly benefiting all beings, including oneself, by entering directly into the awakened state of mind, or Buddhahood, without delay. Again, there are different ways of accomplishing this, but the most powerful, and at the same time the most accessible, is to link ones own mind with the mind of a Buddha.

In visualization practice we imagine ourselves to be a Buddha, in this case the Buddha of Compassion, Chenrezig. By replacing the thought of yourself as you with the thought of yourself as Chenrezig, you gradually reduce and eventually remove the fixation on your personal self, which expands your loving kindness and compassion, toward yourself and toward others, and your intelligence and wisdom becomes enhanced, allowing you to see clearly what someone really needs and to communicate with them clearly and accurately.

In most religious traditions one prays to the deities of the tradition in the hopes of receiving their blessing, which will benefit one in some way. In the vajrayana Buddhist tradition, however, the blessing and the power and the superlative qualities of the enlightened beings are not considered as coming from an outside source, but are believed to be innate, to be aspects of our own true nature. Chenrezig and his love and compassion are within us.

Traditionally wheels were not used at all in Tibet except for spiritual purposes -- carts and similar wheeled devices were known from other cultures, but their use was intentionally avoided. The earliest known mention of prayer wheels is in an account written by a Chinese pilgrim, in 400 AD, while traveling through the area now known as Ladakh. The idea is said to have originated as a play on the phrase "turn the wheel of the dharma," a classical metaphor for Buddha's teaching activity. Mani wheels are found all over Tibet and in areas influenced by Tibetan culture. There are many types of Mani wheels, but small hand-held wheels, like the one shown here, are the most common by far. Tibetan people carry them around for hours, and even on long pilgrimages, spinning them any time they have a hand free.

Larger wheels, which may be several yards (meters) high and one or two yards (meters) in diameter, can contain myriad copies of the mantra, and may also contain sacred texts, up to hundreds of volumes.

They can be found mounted in rows next to pathways, to be spun by people entering a shrine, or along the route which people use as they walk slowly around and around a sacred site -- a form of spiritual practice called circumambulation.

Wheels are also placed where they can be spun by wind or by flowing water. Smaller mounted wheels can be spun by the heat rising from a flame or by steam from a stove, or placed on a tabletop to be spun by hand.

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Tibetan Buddhist Mani wheels are always spun clockwise, as viewed from above, for any or all of several reasons: It rotates the syllables of the mantra so that they would pass a viewer in the order that they would be read, it follows the direction of the sun, and it matches the clockwise circumambulation of stupas. Practitioners of Bon, the pre Buddhist spiritual tradition of Tibet, spin their prayer wheels counter-clockwise, the same direction they use in circumambulation.

Much of Tibetan culture has now had to take refuge outside its homeland. In Tibet under Chinese rule, mechanical wheels are everywhere, on trucks and busses and cars and tanks, but spiritual training and practice, and even learning the Tibetan language, are severely restricted.

With the introduction of Tibetan Buddhism into the West, new types of Mani wheels have come into being. His Holiness the Dalai Lama has said that having the mantra on your computer works the same as a traditional prayer wheel. Since a computer's hard disk spins hundreds of thousands of times per hour, and can contain many copies of the mantra, anyone who wants to can turn their computer into a prayer wheel.

People who feel more strongly connected to prayers other than the Om Mani Padme Hum mantra of Chenrezig can create prayer wheels, of either the mechanical or the electronic type, with the prayers that mean the most to them -- and people who feel a connection to the modern ecumenical or "Great Awakening" movements can include prayers from many traditions, written in any number of languages.

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  tibetan prayer flag

Prayer flags are inscribed with auspicious symbols, invocations, prayers, and mantras. Tibetan Buddhists for centuries have planted these flags outside their homes and places of spiritual practice for the wind to carry the beneficent vibrations across the countryside. Prayer flags are said to bring happiness, long life and prosperity to the flag planter and those in the vicinity.

Dharma prints bear traditional Buddhist symbols, protectors and enlightened beings. As the Buddhist spiritual approach is non theistic, the elements of Tantric iconography do not stand for external beings, but represent aspects of enlightened mind i.e. compassion, perfect action, fearlessness, etc. Displayed with respect, Dharma prints impart a feeling of harmony and bring to mind the precious teachings.

 
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All flags from Radiant Heart are hand printed on good quality 100% cotton fabric with nontoxic colorfast textile paints. The details in each design are quite precise and the colors are pure and bright.

Dharma flags may be placed either inside of a building to increase the spiritual atmosphere or outdoors where the wind can carry their prayers. Traditionally, they are fastened to eaves or sewn onto ropes to be displayed horizontally or they are fastened to wooden poles for vertical display. Sets of five color flags should be put in the order: yellow, green, red, white, blue (from left to right or from bottom to top.) The colors represent the elements: earth, water, fire, cloud, sky.

Because the symbols and mantras on these prints are sacred, we ask that they be treated with the traditional Tibetan respect - please do not place them on the ground or use them in articles of clothing. When disposing of an old print please burn it.

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Featured Handmade Tibetan Jewelry

The most precious & widely used gemstones in Tibetan artworks & Tibetan jewelry - turquoise & coral. Coral is known to be used as a gem since prehistoric times. Has a history of religious meaning and is one of the seven treasures in Buddhist scriptures. Turquoise is one of the world's earliest-used gem materials. Ranked with the jades of the Orient and lapis in the Near East, turquoise has been revered for thousands of years. Coral was long thought to be a strong talisman against bleeding, evil spirits, and hurricanes.

This Handmade Tibetan Double Stone Stirling Silver Necklace is handcrafted by the Tibetan Craftsmen from stirling silver and top-grade natural turquoise and red coral.

This Handmade Tibetan Buddha Eye Pendant was made in Nepal from stirling silver & turquoise. Buddha eye is the Nepali character for the number 1, which symbolizes unity of all the things as well as the one way to reach enlightenment—through the Buddha's teachings. Above this is a third eye, symbolizing the all-seeing wisdom of the Buddha.

This Handmade Tibetan Necklace was made in Nepal from Turquoise, Red Coral, Lapis Lazuli & Stirling Silver. Very Charming Tibet Necklace.

Om Mani Padme Hum can not really be translated into a simple phrase or even a few sentences. By pray the OM Mantra words, all of the Dharma is based on Buddha's discovery that suffering is unnecessary: Like a disease, once we really face the fact that suffering exists, we can look more deeply and discover it's cause; and when we discover that the cause is dependent on certain conditions, we can explore the possibility of removing those conditions.

This pair of Tibetan Earring was handmade in Tibet from sterling silver and Turquoise.

One of the most stunning pieces of Tibetan jewelry is the famed Ghau pendant. Also called a prayer box pendant, this jewelry piece often features rare and unusual gemstones and incredible carved silverworks. In Buddhism, the Ghau is actually a portable shrine that holds an image wrapped in silk that represents the owner's personal deity. Some Ghaus have a small opening allow you to see the personality deity.

Tibetan Buddha Statues come in the shape of every possible Buddhist deity. In general, Buddhism is a practice of finding peace within oneself. Tibetan Buddhism is practiced by people who live in Tibetan, and there are some practices that are unique to Tibetan Buddhism.

In Buddhist practice, singing bowls are used as a support for meditation, trance induction and prayer. For example, Chinese Buddhists use the singing bowl to accompany the wooden fish during chanting, striking it when a particular phrase in a sutra, mantra or hymn is sung. In Japan and Vietnam, singing bowls are similarly used during chanting and may also mark the passage of time or signal a change in activity.

The conch shell is an emblem of power, authority, and sovereignty; its blast is believed to banish evil spirits, avert natural disasters, and scare away poisonous creatures. In Indian culture, different types of conch shells were associated with the different castes and with male and female.

This Tibetan Buddhist Mask - Sakyamuni was made in Tibet from copper.
 
     
 

The Meaning of the Mantra

People who learn about the mantra naturally want to know what it means, and often ask for a translation into English or some other Western language. However, Om Mani Padme Hum can not really be translated into a simple phrase or even a few sentences.
All of the Dharma is based on Buddha's discovery that suffering is unnecessary: Like a disease, once we really face the fact that suffering exists, we can look more deeply and discover it's cause; and when we discover that the cause is dependent on certain conditions, we can explore the possibility of removing those conditions.

Buddha taught many very different methods for removing the cause of suffering, methods appropriate for the very different types and conditions and aptitudes of suffering beings. For those who had the capacity to understand it, he taught the most powerful method of all, a method based on the practice of compassion. It is known as the Mahayana, or Great Vehicle, because practicing it benefits all beings, without partiality. It is likened to a vast boat that carries all the beings in the universe across the sea of suffering.

Within the Mahayana the Buddha revealed the possibility of very quickly benefiting all beings, including oneself, by entering directly into the awakened state of mind, or Buddhahood, without delay. Again, there are different ways of accomplishing this, but the most powerful, and at the same time the most accessible, is to link ones own mind with the mind of a Buddha.

In visualization practice we imagine ourselves to be a Buddha, in this case the Buddha of Compassion, Chenrezig. By replacing the thought of yourself as you with the thought of yourself as Chenrezig, you gradually reduce and eventually remove the fixation on your personal self, which expands your loving kindness and compassion, toward yourself and toward others, and your intelligence and wisdom becomes enhanced, allowing you to see clearly what someone really needs and to communicate with them clearly and accurately.

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In most religious traditions one prays to the deities of the tradition in the hopes of receiving their blessing, which will benefit one in some way. In the vajrayana Buddhist tradition, however, the blessing and the power and the superlative qualities of the enlightened beings are not considered as coming from an outside source, but are believed to be innate, to be aspects of our own true nature. Chenrezig and his love and compassion are within us.

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Although Buddhism originated in India, the teachings of the Buddha and the lineages of awakening were preserved, deepened and clarified in Tibet. The invasion of Tibet by Communist China led to the exile of many of the most highly experienced and respected Tibetan Buddhist meditation masters, who almost immediately began teaching Western students. Many of these students have now become accomplished teachers themselves.

This dharmic feast, now spread out before us in the West, includes a growing array of insights and practices of more and more astonishing richness, power and clarity, from a host of superb teachers, translators editors and publishers, all attracting committed students and curious visitors. And now the Internet makes it even easier to locate resources to further ones interest.

What the Internet won't do is make it easier to sit down on a meditation cushion, or face the ways we mislead ourselves. It can, though, help find people to study with, and practice with, and to laugh with at the many ways we find for misleading ourselves.

An ancient prophesy speaks of the darkest hour of the dark age, when the rivers of materialism burst their banks, and plague, famine, greed and warefare beset desperate people everywhere. That Dark Age -- which may be right about now -- will also be known as the Golden Age, because many living buddhas will choose to be born at that time, bringing the precious healing Dharma to anyone ready to receive it.  May it be so!

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People and Monks

People of Tibet - The Divinest of All! Tibet serves as a home to many communities like Menpa, Han, Chinese, Sherpa, Dengs and Luopa. The area is quite thinly populated with only 1.68 persons per sq. km on an average. The overall population of Tibet is around 260,0000. The ancestors of the present Tibetans lived on both sides of Tsangpo River and mainly earned their livelihood from cultivation of barely, wheat and peas. There is also nomadic population in Tibet that keeps moving from one place to other herding their yaks and sheep. But slowly more and more people are moving towards cities for better education and job.

Are Tibetans A Holy Lot?

You will witness a number of religions practice prevailing in the region as the majority of the population is the firm follower of Buddhism. People who follow Islam and Catholicism are present in large numbers, especially in Lhasa and Yanjing. Tibet has the largest number of monks in the world with almost 1/3 of the population being a monk. They are considered to be the ultimate followers of Buddhism. Even you will feel internally rejuvenated by finding the people so optimistic and so proud of their beliefs and religion. Tibetan is the main language that is spoken here. Although the accent and pronunciation varies from region to region but most of them belong to the Sino- Tibetan phylum. 

What is the Occupation of Tibetans!

Majority of the people are still confined to agriculture sector, but the number has been steadily declining. More and more people are getting educated and moving out into the cities for jobs in factories and government postings. Since most tourists more often travel only to the important destinations and leave, they miss out on a lot of local and unique stuff that is really worth visiting.

What Makes Tibitan Lifestyle!

What will strike you the most is the life style and nature of the people of Tibet. They all seem so happy and content in whatever way they live, they work, right from their homes, the dress they wear to the knife they carry, everything is so detailed and carefully chosen. Each community has its own traditional clothing for both men and women. One can easily distinguish the people from their clothing itself.

Want to Know More About The People of Tibet?

Tibet, you will learn how to be happy and live a life full of contentment without a complaint. Just pass a smile to a Tibetan who is looking at you and believe us you will get an even bigger smile in return. This is the way they are much warm, caring and full of hospitality towards their guests for whom they will go out of the way to help. To learn the simple courtesies of life and to acclimatize moral values there is no other place better than Tibet where one can learn the best of it. They seem like a new breed of humans, happy the way they are, totally unperturbed by outside world. Come to Tibet and get to know these wonderful people, from whom we can still learn a lot about life.
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Arts and Crafts of Tibet

Looking For Arts and Cafts of Tibet ! Tibetan art and craft is one of the virtues of the town that can be traced in its most original form, not been influenced even a bit by the western styles and traditions. And the people of Tibet are proud of their this cultural heritage. Whatever be the field, painting, music, crafts, Tibet has its own identity, its own charm.

What are the Famous Art Form of Tibet !

People of Tibet consider paintings as strong medium for spreading their knowledge and religion to all possible parts of the world. Most of the paintings portray an unshakable belief of people in Buddhism and the way they lead their life. Most of the paintings in Tibet are frescoes, cliff paintings, Thangka and wood-prints. You will see most of the cliff paintings on huge rocks and what you will find most astonishing will be the close resemblance of these paintings to mid- Asian cliff paintings. Probably, this is because the cliff painting in Tibet is prevalent from pre historic times. Even the frescoes that you will see on the walls of temples, monasteries and palaces are close to the ones that are found in India. 

Is Tibet Famous For Its Handicraft Items !

Handicraft works in Tibet are quite unique and rare and their specializations are also quite incomparable. Sharp knives, as a handicraft product, are quite flattering. They are in-fact very beautiful to look at and the shape, decorations and attention given to the minutest of detail, will without a doubt leave you spellbound and definitely increases the temptation to possess one. Though you cannot carry a knife on a flight but you can definitely send them by post to your living place. So when you reach home, expect a shiny and sharp gift from Tibet, waiting for you.

Silver ornaments are also very famous in Tibet. These are worn by almost every citizen of Tibet. These ornaments are studded with different prestigious stones that also are considered to be a symbol of health and good luck. You would not like to leave Tibet without one for yourself as they are exceptionally elegant and classy in looks. Other things that should be part of your shopping list in Tibet are Tibetan carpets, masks and rugs.

Do Painted Structure Symbolize Tibet Art !

Painting of the structure in Tibet also form a major part in the showcasing the rich art skills. It is sure that the moment you enter a Tibet city, first thing that catches your eyes will be the intricate use of colors on the walls and roofs of temples, monasteries as well as houses. People here believe that colors have a language of their own and can communicate a feeling very easily. The best example of this is the Potala Palace. The red and white colors used in the building symbolizes power and peace respectively. Apart from the use of colors, even the structure of these buildings is unique.

Want to Know More About Tibet Art and Craft !

Tibet is a place where you will find art in almost all aspects of life of people. Be it the decorations in their homes, the clothes they wear or even the knife they carry with themselves should be artistic. You can find all these items to buy on the Barkhor Street which is the biggest market in Tibet. So from the time you land in Tibet, look out for some of the most stunning works of crafts and do catch the most unique form of art in the paintings, handicrafts and architecture of Tibet.

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